Auld Lang Syne Miss Understood, The Real Facts.

The song ‘Auld Lang Syne’ is sung at the stroke of midnight in almost every English speaking country in the world to bring in the new year.  At least partially written by Robert Burns in the 1700’s it was first published in 1796 after Mr. Burn’s death.  Robert Burns is the person whose transcription got the most attention, so the song is associated with him.  It turns out that ‘Auld Lang Syne’ is an extremely old Scottish song.  ‘Auld Lang Syne literally means “old long ago,” or simply “the good old days.”  So we sing this song, we are saying “We’ll drink a cup of kindness yet for good old times gone by.”

Isn’t it strange how it’s possible to sing and hear a song so many times and yet have no idea what we’re singing or what it means? Here are the words to the song so that we can sing it loud and proud.

AULD LANG SYNE

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and days of auld lang syne?
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
and days of auld lang syne?
And here’s a hand, my trusty friend
And gie’s a hand o’thine
We’ll take a cup of o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

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